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Art: Starting Points

Art images and local resources for many topics, including: American Art, Medieval Art, Modern Art, Renaissance and Baroque Art, Scandinavian Art, and Women Artists

Style Guides

The Chicago style is the most commonly used format for Art History research.

Click here for examples of how to cite works of art in Chicago style.

Citing Works of Art

Works of Art in a Museum

Artists's last name, first name. Title of the Work. Place where found, location of place where found, composition year.

Klimt, Gustav. The Kiss. Oesterreichische Galerie im Belvedere, Vienna, Austria, 1907.

Photographs of Works of Art (i.e., from a book)

Artists's last name, first name. Title of the Work. Place where found, location of place where found, in Author's first and last name, Title of Book in which photograph appears. Place of publication: publisher, year, page number.

Degas, Edgar. Woman With Binoculars. Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden, in Barbara Ehrlich White, Impressionists Side by Side: Their Friendships, Rivalries, and Artistic Exchanges. New York: Knopf, 1996, 192.

Images Found Online

Artists's last name, first name. Title of the Work. Place where found, location of place where found, composition year. Web address (access date).

Klimt, Gustav. The Kiss. Oesterreichische Galerie im Belvedere, Vienna, Austria, 1907. Http://www.artstor.org/ (accessed September 9, 2009).

Finding Images

There are a lot of places where you can find images to help with your research. Try ARTstor first, but you can also look at some of the Web Resources listed at the bottom of each page.  Some include image collections.

Google Image Search

You can find countless images here, but use with caution. The size and quality of the images vary widely. Descriptions may be short, nonexistent, or even downright wrong. The images you find may be under copyright, so use with caution.

Databases

The databases listed here all have significant Art and Art History components, making them good places to begin looking for articles for your research project.

Note: Images that appear fine in print may not look very good when scanned for electronic versions of articles, or they may not even be included at all. You can check to see if we have a print copy on hand by doing a Journal Title Search.

Books

We've got a large collection of art books in our catalog. You can search for artists' names, movements, regional divisions, mediums, etc. For example:

  • Picasso
  • Impressionism
  • French Art
  • Pencil Drawing

 

Sometimes you just want to browse the collection. Look for Art books on the Lower Level in two different places: the regular Ns towards the back of the building and the Oversize section in the fixed shelves in the middle. Here's a basic breakdown of the call numbers that are used to organize art books. (You can find a more detailed breakdown here.)

 

N Visual Arts (General)
NA Architecture
NB Sculpture
NC Drawing. Design. Illustration
ND Painting
NE Print media
NK Decorative arts. Applied arts
NX Arts in general

 

You may also want to consult one of the reference works listed below. Dictionaries and encyclopedias provide concise, detailed, scholarly descriptions of artists, movements, specific works, and more. Use them for background information and to find effective search terms for online databases. Look for these books in the reference section, on the first level of the library by the Research Desk.

Librarian

Mike Bloomberg
Contact:
612-617-2871

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Credits

Created by Matt Voss in Fall 2009

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